arrow grid linear view icon
The College of Arts Sciences Search

Current Courses

Sort by: TitleNumber
Filter by:
HEBRW 1101 : Elementary Modern Hebrew I
Crosslisted as: JWST 1101, JWST 1101 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Intended for beginners. Provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. Students who complete the course are able to function in basic situations in a Hebrew-speaking environment.
View course details
Description
HEBRW 1102 : Elementary Modern Hebrew II
Crosslisted as: JWST 1102, JWST 1102 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Intended for beginners. Provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. Students who complete the course are able to function in basic situations in a Hebrew-speaking environment.
View course details
Description
HEBRW 1103 : Elementary Modern Hebrew III
Crosslisted as: JWST 1103 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Sequel to HEBRW 1101-HEBRW 1102. Continued development of reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking skills.
View course details
Description
ARAB 1200 : Intensive Arabic I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course designed for students who are interested in completing Cornell's Elementary Arabic sequence (ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202) in the spring semester. This will be a useful course for students who miss taking Elementary Arabic I in the fall since the course is not offered in the spring.  Students finishing this course will be in a position to take ARAB 1203 - Intermediate Arabic I.
View course details
Description
ARAB 1201 : Elementary Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1201, ASRC 1201, ASRC 1201, ASRC 1201, ASRC 1201 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ARAB 1202 : Elementary Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1202, ASRC 1202, ASRC 1202, ASRC 1202 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This two-course sequence assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc.). These topics are listed in the textbook's table of contents.  The student who successfully completes the two-course sequence will have mastered about 1000 basic words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations on a limited range of practical topics such as self-identification, family, school, work, the weather, travel, etc., 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 180 words written in Arabic script, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 50-word paragraph in Arabic.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ARAB 1203 : Intermediate Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1203, ASRC 1203 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
NES 1312 : Introduction to Urdu Script
Crosslisted as: URDU 1125 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This class is an introductory class for beginners. This course will teach students how to listen, speak, read and write Urdu through vocabulary, grammar, oral and written activities, with an emphasis on reading and writing basic Urdu. The course begins by introducing the alphabet and their combinations. In addition to learning the script we will also introduce the basic knowledge and background on Urdu culture.
View course details
Description
PERSN 1320 : Elementary Persian/Farsi I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Intended for beginners and heritage speakers alike, this course is a quick and easy way to a popular worldly language in a modern day context (Farsi)!  Students develop all four skills - speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Additional materials from authentic culture-focused readings and Persian poetry are an integral part of the curriculum. By the end of this course students will be able to actively participate in conversations centered around family and friends, hometown, country, studies and work, daily activities, modern Iran as well as write extensively on familiar topics. Students will acquire cultural competence and be able to function in authentic Persian cultural context using the taarof.
View course details
Description
PERSN 1321 : Elementary Persian/Farsi II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Intended for beginners and heritage speakers alike, this course is a quick and easy way to a popular worldly language in a modern day context (Farsi)!  Students develop all four skills - speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Additional materials from authentic culture-focused readings and Persian poetry are an integral part of the curriculum. By the end of this course students will be able to actively participate in conversations centered around family and friends, hometown, country, studies and work, daily activities, modern Iran as well as write extensively on familiar topics. Students will acquire cultural competence and be able to function in authentic Persian cultural context using the taarof.
View course details
Description
PERSN 1322 : Intermediate Persian/Farsi I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The course is designed with strong integration of modern colloquial Persian (Farsi).  Only colloquial Persian is used for all speaking and listening activities, while reading and writing tasks are performed in formal Persian. Authentic material drawn from Persian language TV, radio and movies is introduced regularly in accordance with the topic and vocabulary of given week.  By the end of the semester students will be able to speak, read and comprehend material on a range of social, cultural, political and everyday topics. You'll learn how to write emails and notes as educated Persian speakers, read Persian newspapers and comprehend audio material intended for native speakers. We'll also delve into Persian folk tales, modern Persian rap and pop and Persian humor.
View course details
Description
TURK 1330 : Elementary Turkish I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, learners will develop a basic foundation in reading, writing, listening, and beginning conversation skills in contemporary Turkish. In this introductory semester, learners will read short texts on Turkish culture, handle non-complex social conversations, understand sentence-level statements and write simple paragraphs on familiar topics. The course format will focus on initially exploring a subject through listening, video, and reading short pieces or excerpts, before moving into practice and application through informal presentations, discussions, short writing, and role play. This course is for new learners of Turkish.
View course details
Description
TURK 1331 : Elementary Turkish II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, learners will continue to develop their reading, listening, speaking, and writing beyond the foundation established in Elementary Turkish I. In this semester, learners will advance towards the Intermediate level as well as beginning to feel comfortable and confident getting around in Turkey, undertaking very basic research, and communicating with native Turkish speakers. The format will continue to focus on introducing subjects through receptive skills (reading/listening/watching) with learners then working on projects and longer writing in order to master applicable language.
View course details
Description
TURK 1332 : Intermediate Turkish I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, learners will advance their reading, writing, listening and conversation skills in contemporary Turkish as they move towards extended conversation, written communication, academic listening/watching, and research. The format of this program will focus on reading authentic materials, talking about topics of interest, giving presentations, writing short essays, and understanding the main points of a lecture and certain media, such as TV programs, interviews, and talk shows. Learners will start to actively determine the direction of their development via input on subjects for group work, presentations and further reading and research.
View course details
Description
NES 1561 : Introduction to the Ottoman Empire
Crosslisted as: HIST 1561 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to the study of the Ottoman Empire from its inception in the late 13th century until the early part of 19th century. The classes will follow the main timeline of the geographical expansion of the empire with a special emphasis on the historical significance of the conquest of Istanbul, the consolidation of the borders of the empire, the establishment of the state apparatus in the classical period, a period of turbulence leading to a substantial transformation of the state in the early 19th century. Special focus will be placed on the Ottoman Empire's diverse religious communities—using the history of the Jewish community as the main case study—the evolution of the imperial and provincial governments' relationships with the various socio-cultural groups, legal and economic practices in the urban centers, the culture of the court in the early modern period, and the evolution of the inter-communal relations in the empire's urban centers.  This course is intended to provide the student with a solid foundation from which they can pursue further specialized study in the history of the Ottoman Empire, the Modern Middle East, and the Eastern Mediterranean.
View course details
Description
NES 1602 : Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 1702, CLASS 1702 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.
View course details
Description
NES 1660 : The Vikings and their World
Crosslisted as: HIST 1660, MEDVL 1660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Globalisation may seem like a recent hot topic, but it was already very much in vogue 1000 years ago when Norse explorers burst out of Scandinavia to journey as far as North America, Azerbaijan, the Mediterranean and the White Sea. This course will introduce students to the Norsemen and women of the Viking Age and the centuries following it, weaving together literary, chronicle, archaeological and other sources to tell the remarkable stories of these medieval entrepreneurs and of the many people and places they encountered. Along the way, students will also pick up crucial historical thinking skills: assessing change and continuity over time, learning the basics of source criticism, and gaining an appreciation for interdisciplinary research. This course qualifies for credit towards the undergraduate minor in Viking Studies. 
View course details
Description
NES 1918 : FWS: Slow Time:Chronopolitics of Iranian Cinema
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 1930 : FWS: Powerful Words: Reading Ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
When writing arouses admiration, awe, or pity, it can move people to act. Such texts surround us and include forms developed millennia ago in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Students will learn to recognize how ancient scribes communicated (with gods and men), educated, lamented, persuaded, and animated. Course readings (in translation) include the Epic of Gilgamesh,   Tale of Sinuhe, teachings, law codes, propaganda, magic spells, correspondence, and philosophical musings in both prose and poetry. Influence on the Hebrew Bible and Koran will become apparent, as will the awareness that contemporary culture resonates with ancient meanings. Understanding these early, artful writing techniques will become meaningful as students develop their own to communicate their reactions and interpretations to other students and the instructor.
View course details
Description
NES 1932 : FWS: Conflict, Coexistence and Cohesion: Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Medieval Mediterranean
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 1935 : FWS: The Many Lives of Biblical Joseph
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Joseph "novella" is unique in the biblical text and the character of Joseph himself extends far beyond biblical boundaries, inspiring retellings and new accounts of Joseph's adventures.  To what can we attribute this character's endurance and persistence?  In this class, we will examine the numerous interpretations and reinterpretations of the biblical Joseph story (in translation), ranging from inside the Bible to outside, including pseudepigrapha, Talmud, Sura Yusef in the Qur'an, and modern literary allusions.  What inspired scribes or inspires authors to reuse familiar characters?  Student essays will examine the processes of scribal practice, the function and utility of texts in the ancient world, and the amplification or de-emphasis of aspects of Joseph to fit a society's needs.
View course details
Description
NES 1935 : FWS: The Many Lives of Biblical Joseph
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Joseph "novella" is unique in the biblical text and the character of Joseph himself extends far beyond biblical boundaries, inspiring retellings and new accounts of Joseph's adventures.  To what can we attribute this character's endurance and persistence?  In this class, we will examine the numerous interpretations and reinterpretations of the biblical Joseph story (in translation), ranging from inside the Bible to outside, including pseudepigrapha, Talmud, Sura Yusef in the Qur'an, and modern literary allusions.  What inspired scribes or inspires authors to reuse familiar characters?  Student essays will examine the processes of scribal practice, the function and utility of texts in the ancient world, and the amplification or de-emphasis of aspects of Joseph to fit a society's needs.
View course details
Description
NES 1963 : FWS: That's in the Bible? Archaeology and the Religion of Ancient Israel
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A casual reading of the Hebrew Scriptures might lead one to believe that the normative religion of the Israelites was that spelled out in the Torah and Prophets.  However, a more critical appraisal of the Biblical texts, along with an analysis of extra-Biblical texts and archaeological materials, demonstrates that the Israelites were often closer to their pagan neighbors than to modern Judaism or Christianity.  Students will explore these similarities and differences in their essays.  Topics may include: cult prostitution, magic, funerary rites, temple ritual, Hebrew mythology, etc.  Readings will be from the Hebrew Bible, translations of extra-biblical texts, articles on archaeology and modern synthetic treatments of Israelite culture.
View course details
Description
NES 1963 : FWS: That's in the Bible? Archaeology and the Religion of Ancient Israel
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A casual reading of the Hebrew Scriptures might lead one to believe that the normative religion of the Israelites was that spelled out in the Torah and Prophets.  However, a more critical appraisal of the Biblical texts, along with an analysis of extra-Biblical texts and archaeological materials, demonstrates that the Israelites were often closer to their pagan neighbors than to modern Judaism or Christianity.  Students will explore these similarities and differences in their essays.  Topics may include: cult prostitution, magic, funerary rites, temple ritual, Hebrew mythology, etc.  Readings will be from the Hebrew Bible, translations of extra-biblical texts, articles on archaeology and modern synthetic treatments of Israelite culture.
View course details
Description
NES 1985 : FWS: Writing Under Pressure: Arabic Fiction in Times of Crisis
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines Arabic fiction written under conditions of crisis, when the author's life or safety was under threat due to war, famine, a totalitarian regime, etc. All readings will be available in English translation. We will read fiction from Lebanon's civil war period (1975-1990), the Iraqi Gulf War and economic sanctions (1990-2003), Egypt under Hosni Mubarak (1981-2011), and more. Students will answer the following questions in their essays: what compels an author to write despite the imminence of existential threat? What does each author want to convey most urgently about the crisis he/she is experiencing? How does crisis shape writing—how do authors protect themselves from crises and how does that impact their writing style?    
View course details
Description
HEBRW 2100 : Intermediate Modern Hebrew
Crosslisted as: JWST 2100 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course is aimed at training students in exact and idiomatic Hebrew, expanding vocabulary and usage of grammatical knowledge, and acquiring facility of expression in both conversation and writing. Uses written and oral exercises built around the texts. Reading and discussion of selections from Hebrew literature and Israeli culture through the use of texts and audiovisual materials.
View course details
Description
ARAB 2201 : Arabic for Heritage Speakers
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2105 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed for students who can speak and understand a spoken Arabic dialect (Egyptian, Lebanese, Syrian, Iraqi, etc.) but have little or no knowledge of written Arabic, known as Classical Arabic, Modern Standard Arabic, or Fusha. The focus of the course will be on developing the reading and writing skills through the use of graded, but challenging and interesting materials. As they develop their reading and writing skills, students will be learning about Arab history, society, and culture. Classroom activities will be conducted totally in Arabic. Students will not be expected or pressured to speak in Classical Arabic, but will use their own dialects for speaking purposes. However, one of the main goals of the course will be to help the development of the skills to communicate and understand Educated Spoken Arabic, a form of Arabic that is based on the spoken dialects but uses the educated vocabulary and structures of Fusha.
View course details
Description
NES 2201 : Intermediate Urdu Reading and Writing I
Crosslisted as: URDU 2225 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed to develop competence in Urdu reading and writing for students with a first-year knowledge of Hindi and knowledge of Urdu script. The goal of this course is to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing abilities in Urdu. By the end of the course, students will have the ability to read articles, write short stories and translate Urdu writings. May be taken concurrently with Intermediate Hindi.
View course details
Description
ARAB 2202 : Intermediate Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2200, ASRC 2200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this two-course sequence learners continue to develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and grammar foundation through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics.  While more attention is given to developing native-like pronunciation and to grammatical accuracy than in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, the main focus of the course will be on encouraging fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas in it.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence will have mastered over 1500 new words and will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations related to a wide variety of topics beyond those covered in ARAB 1201 and ARAB 1202, such as the history and geography of the Arab world, food and health, sports, economic matters, the environment, politics, the Palestine problem, etc. 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, passages of up to 300 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 150-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 1202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Intermediate Mid to the Advanced Mid level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
NES 2202 : Intermediate Urdu Reading and Writing II
Crosslisted as: URDU 2226 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed to develop competence in Urdu reading and writing for students with a first-year knowledge of Hindi and knowledge of Urdu script. The goal of this course is to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing abilities in Urdu. By the end of the course, students will have the ability to read articles, write short stories and translate Urdu writings. This course may be taken concurrently with Intermediate Hindi.
View course details
Description
ARAB 2204 : Introduction to Quranic Arabic
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2204, RELST 2204 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed for students who are interested in reading the language of the Qur'an with accuracy and understanding. The first week (4 classes) will be devoted to an introduction of the history of the Qur'an: the revelation, collection, variant readings, and establishment of an authoritative edition. The last week will be devoted to a general overview of "revisionist" literature on the Qur'an. In the remaining 12 weeks, we will cover all of Part 30 (Juz' 'Amma, suuras 78-114) and three suuras of varying length (36, 19, and 12).
View course details
Description
NES 2273 : Introduction to Religious Studies: Religion and Environmental Studies
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2273, RELST 2273 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces the academic study of religion. The topics vary from year to year.
View course details
Description
PERSN 2322 : Intermediate Persian/Farsi II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course is designed with strong integration of modern colloquial Persian (Farsi).  Only colloquial Persian is used for all speaking and listening activities, while reading and writing tasks are performed in formal Persian. Authentic material drawn from Persian language TV, radio and movies is introduced regularly in accordance with the topic and vocabulary of given week.  By the end of the semester students will be able to speak, read and comprehend material on a range of social, cultural, political and everyday topics. You'll learn how to write emails and notes as educated Persian speakers, read Persian newspapers and comprehend audio material intended for native speakers. We'll also delve into Persian folk tales, modern Persian rap and pop and Persian humor.
View course details
Description
TURK 2332 : Intermediate Turkish II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
At this level, learners will be working on understanding and expressing complex ideas. They will delve into Turkish culture, society, history, and other academic subjects in depth. Upon finishing the course successfully, learners will be able to express themselves clearly and develop arguments both in writing and speaking, as well as understanding films, and reading articles on a wide variety of academic topics.
View course details
Description
NES 2515 : Anthropology of Iran
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2415, RELST 2515 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 2575 : Myth and Religion in Mesopotamia
Crosslisted as: JWST 2575, NES 6575, RELST 2575 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will survey the cultic practices and beliefs of ancient Babylonia and Assyria, the two major civilizations of Mesopotamia. We will examine the major myths of this region, e.g., Ishtar's Descent into the Netherworld, Etana, and Gilgamesh, in light of what they reveal about Mesopotamian religion, politics, and understanding of the afterlife. We will also examine the performance of magical rituals and incantations, methods of predicting the future, and the role of sacred marriage, prostitution, and slavery in the ancient temple.
View course details
Description
NES 2601 : An Introduction to the Ancient Near East
Crosslisted as: JWST 2601 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The pyramids and mummies of Egypt, the ziggurats of Babylonia, and the armies of Assyria are all part of the legacy of the ancient Near East. This course serves as a basic introduction to the history, societies, and cultures of the major civilizations of the ancient world from c. 3300-300 B.C., focusing on Egypt and Mesopotamia but including lesser-known groups such as the Hittites in Anatolia and the Elamites in Iran. Students will learn how these states were organized, how each culture related to their gods, and how they chose to be remembered, as well as many other mysteries of the ancient world.
View course details
Description
NES 2626 : Modern Islam
Crosslisted as: RELST 2626 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1798, Napoleon Bonaparte led a French expedition to Egypt, fighting a campaign that would extend to Syria and last three years. Napoleon's journey, however, signalled far more than the beginning of a military exercise: over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Muslims throughout the Middle East and South Asia came to engage with the ideas, technologies, and political power of Europe in unprecedented ways that deeply shaped the path of Islamic history. This course, in turn, explores these shifts over the past two centuries. It is designed to introduce students not only to the leading ideas and movements among Muslims over the past two hundred years, but also to how these ideas have shaped the lives of Muslims living in Muslim-majority countries and Muslim-minority countries alike. It will push students to consider how Islam has changed over the past two centuries and how these changes are similar to and different from the transformations that have emerged in other religious traditions. Topics will include: Gender and Modesty; Prayer and Ritual; Ethics; Constitutionalism; Sufism; and Modern Islamic Movements. Through these topics, students will examine the diverse contexts in which and methods by which Muslims have interpreted their foundational texts, and more generally, their often-competing understandings of Islam what it means to be a Muslim.
View course details
Description
NES 2629 : New Testament/Early Christian Literatures
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2613, JWST 2629, RELST 2629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a literary and historical introduction to the earliest Christian writings, especially those that eventually came to be included in the New Testament.  Through the lens of the Gospel narratives and earliest Christian letters, especially those of Paul, we will explore the rich diversity of the early Christian movement from its Jewish roots in first-century Palestine through its development and spread to Asia Minor and beyond.   We will give careful consideration to the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious circumstances that gave rise to the Jesus movement, as well as those that facilitated the emergence of various manifestations of Christian belief and practice.   The course will address themes like identity and ethnicity, conversion and debate, race and slavery, gender and sexuality, and the connections between politics and religion.
View course details
Description
NES 2644 : Introduction to Judaism
Crosslisted as: JWST 2644, RELST 2644 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Jewish communities have been established, flourished and often struggled for millennia, throughout much of the world, and in vital contact with a vast range of other peoples and cultures. This course examines the constant and dynamic tension between that which unites Jews in all these different times and places, and that which makes every Jew a person of his or her own time and place. Our whirlwind tour will take us from ancient Israel, through Babylonia and the world of early Islam, into the medieval origins of Ashkenazi Jewry, down to Ottoman North Africa, and all the way across the Indian Ocean. We will learn how Jewish and other diaspora communities overcome challenges to maintain their distinctive identities, how to engage critically with the ways contemporary scholars the records of these far-flung communities, and how to generate their own critical questions.
View course details
Description
NES 2649 : Controversy and Debate in Islam
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2247, RELST 2247 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Whether it is politics, society, the law, sexuality, popular culture or minorities' rights, the media are saturated with news on Islam. This course introduces topical issues in Islam as a religious, historical, cultural and political phenomenon. We will discuss this religion's manifold interpretations and investigate its multiple manifestations across the globe, giving special attention to Asia (from Iran to China, Indonesia, Afghanistan, India, Thailand, etc.). Key themes include religious devotion, the arts, Islamic law, gender, statehood, jihad, and sectarianism. No previous knowledge of Islam is required as the course covers the fundamentals of Islam as a religious system as well as a historical phenomenon.
View course details
Description
NES 2655 : Introduction to Islamic Civilization
Crosslisted as: HIST 2530, MEDVL 2655, RELST 2655 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
At the beginning of the 7th century, a new religion, Islam, appeared in Arabia and by the end of the century, Muslims had defeated the Byzantines and Persians and created an empire that stretched from Spain to India. For the next millennium, Islam glittered. Its caliphs, courts, and capitals were grander, more powerful, and more sophisticated than those of any medieval king, duke or prince. In this course, we will trace the emergence and development of Islamic civilization from the birth of Muhammad ca. 570 to the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258. We will read the Qur'an and listen to its recitation; examine the career of the Prophet Muhammad; follow the course of the Arab conquests; explore the nature of the conflict between Sunnis and Shi'is; learn about the five pillars of Islam, sharia law, theology, and Sufism; and assess the achievements of Muslim intellectuals in literature, art, architecture, science, and philosophy. Friday sections are devoted to the analysis of primary sources in English translation. No previous knowledge required.
View course details
Description
NES 2661 : Ancient Ships and Seafaring: Introduction to Nautical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2661 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 2668 : Ancient Egyptian Civilization
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2668 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course surveys the history and culture of pharaonic Egypt from its prehistoric origins down to the early first millennium bce. Within a chronological framework, the following themes or topics will be considered: the development of the Egyptian state (monarchy, administration, ideology), social organization (class, gender and family, slavery), economic factors, and empire and international relations.
View course details
Description
NES 2676 : Holy War, Crusade, and Jihad from Antiquity to Present
Crosslisted as: JWST 2676, MEDVL 2676, RELST 2676 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Articulating and elaborating religious justifications for war is a cultural practice unique to the three monotheistic traditions and their respective textual communities. This notion and its practice have had profound historical consequences in the past that extend to and inform present-day global socio-political conflicts. The first part of this course will examine the origins of the concept of holy war, crusade and jihad and trace their cultural histories. The second part of the course will be devoted to discussing the ways in which contemporary discourses such as a "clash of civilizations," "the Evil Empire," "The Great Satan," and the "Axis of Evil" draw upon these respective cultural histories and explicitly or implicitly positing political conflict as a "battle for God."
View course details
Description
NES 2724 : Introduction to the Hebrew Bible
Crosslisted as: JWST 2724, RELST 2724 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is a repository of ancient Israelite religious, political, social, historical, and literary traditions. For the modern reader these ancient traditions are often obscured by a focus on the text as revelation. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the biblical world by reading the Hebrew Bible in translation, on its own terms, as a body of literature that evolved in an ancient Near Eastern context. The Bible itself will be the primary text for the course, but students will also be exposed to the rich and diverse textual traditions of the ancient Near East, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Moab, and Ugarit. In addition, this course will explore the impact of early biblical interpretation on shaping the monotheistic traditions inherited in the West. As participants in a secular course on the Bible, students will be challenged to question certain cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible, and will be expected to differentiate between a text's content and its presumed meaning.
View course details
Description
NES 2754 : Wondrous Literatures of the Near East
Crosslisted as: COML 2754, JWST 2754 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines Near East's rich and diverse literary heritage. We will read a selection of influential and wondrous texts from ancient to modern times, spanning geographically from the Iberian peninsula to Iran. We will trace three major threads: myths of creation and destruction; travel narratives; and poetry of love and devotion. Together we will read and discuss such ancient works as the 'Epic of Gilgamesh' and 'The Song of Songs,' as well as selections from medieval works such as the 'Travels' of Ibn Battuta, the 'Shahnameh' of Ferdowsi, poetry of Yehuda HaLevi, and The Thousand and One Nights. The modern unit will include work by Egyptian Nobel Laureate, Naguib Mahfouz. Students will also have the opportunity to research and analyze primary source materials in the collections of Cornell Rare Books and Manuscript Collection, and the Johnson Art Museum. All material is in English translation.
View course details
Description
HEBRW 3101 : Advanced Modern Hebrew: Special Topics in Hebrew
Crosslisted as: JWST 3101 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Successful completion of NES 3101 fulfills Option 1 language requirement. Advanced study of the Hebrew Language both orally and through the analysis of mostly unedited texts of social, political, and cultural relevance with less emphasis on the study of grammar. Students are introduced to articles published in Israeli newspapers, magazines, works by authors and movies. Students develop composition and advanced writing skills by studying language structure, idioms, and various registers of style.
View course details
Description
HEBRW 3102 : Advanced Modern Hebrew II: Hebrew in a Changing World
Crosslisted as: JWST 3102 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students will be practicing and enhancing conversational skills. The course aims to improve the four language skills while stressing listening comprehension and various forms of discussions including practical situations. A close reading of selected works of Modern Hebrew fiction, poetry, and drama in their cultural and historical contexts.  In addition we'll be Reading Newspaper articles relating to Middle-Eastern and European aspects of Israeli literature and culture.
View course details
Description
HEBRW 3104 : Dynamics and Changes of Israeli Culture and Language
Crosslisted as: JWST 3104 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The course focuses and explores the development and changes of Modern Hebrew in all aspects of Israeli and Jewish culture.  A close reading of selected works of modern Hebrew fiction, poetry, drama in their cultural and historical contexts.  Reading a few modern children stories and discussion of the present-day influence on Israeli children's literature.  During the semester we'll be paying attention to students language skills, interests, building vocabulary, grammar review, and literary analysis of a sampling of modern texts.
View course details
Description
ARAB 3201 : Advanced Arabic I
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3100 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ARAB 3202 : Advanced Arabic II
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3101 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this two-semester sequence, learners will be introduced to authentic, unedited Arabic language materials ranging from short stories, and poems, to newspaper articles dealing with social,  political,  and cultural issues. Emphasis will be on developing fluency in oral expression through discussions of issues presented in the reading and listening selections. There will be more focus on the development of native-like pronunciation and accurate use of grammatical structures than in the previous four courses. A primary objective of the course is the development of the writing skill through free composition exercises in topics of interest to individual students.  This course starts where ARAB 2202 leaves off and continues the development of the four language skills and grammar foundation using 18 themes, some new and some introduced in previous courses but are presented here at a more challenging level.  The student who successfully completes this two-course sequence have mastered over 3000 new words and will be able, within context of the 18 new and recycled themes to: 1) understand and actively participate in conversations, 2) read and understand, with the help of a short list of words, authentic, unedited passages of up to 400 words, and 3) discuss orally in class and write a 300-word paragraph in Arabic with fewer grammatical errors than in ARAB 2202.  The two-course sequence aims to take the student from the Advanced Mid to the Superior level according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
View course details
Description
ARAB 3210 : Arabic Grammar and Writing (in Arabic)
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course, taught entirely in Arabic, will focus on those aspects of Arabic grammar that are relevant for the correct reading and writing of Modern Standard Arabic such as the case and mood system (I'raab), the construct (IDaafa), the verb forms and their derivatives, different passive constructions, the number and gender systems, and different types of agreement. The readings will consist of a variety of texts (short stories, newspaper articles, poems, and biographies) which will be used as a basis for writing compositions.
View course details
Description
NES 3325 : Literary Reading and Writing in Advanced Urdu
Crosslisted as: URDU 3325 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Designed for those students who have either taken Intermediate Urdu or are at the same level of competency in reading and writing skills. The goals of this class are to improve Urdu literary reading and writing abilities, primarily through reading various forms of Urdu prose. In addition, students learn about various genres of Urdu poetry and watch video clips and lectures that enhance listening and speaking abilities as well as the understanding and appreciation of Urdu culture.
View course details
Description
NES 3511 : Performing Islam in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3311, ASIAN 6611, RELST 3311 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What role does Islam take in the politics, history, arts and rituals of Southeast Asia? Structured as a seminar, this course takes you on a journey through Southeast Asia, home to almost a quarter of the global Muslim population, to explore how centuries of cultural mixing and layering have shaped the regions' religious outlook. How are local traditions and universal Islamic precepts reconciled? How is this manifested in the performative arts and rituals? How does Islam play out in governance and the law? How is Islam deployed in the transnational sphere? Previous knowledge of Islam is an advantage, but not a requisite to succeed in this course. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Islam as a religious system as well as a historical phenomenon throughout the course.
View course details
Description
NES 3511 : Performing Islam in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3311, ASIAN 6611, RELST 3311 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What role does Islam take in the politics, history, arts and rituals of Southeast Asia? Structured as a seminar, this course takes you on a journey through Southeast Asia, home to almost a quarter of the global Muslim population, to explore how centuries of cultural mixing and layering have shaped the regions' religious outlook. How are local traditions and universal Islamic precepts reconciled? How is this manifested in the performative arts and rituals? How does Islam play out in governance and the law? How is Islam deployed in the transnational sphere? Previous knowledge of Islam is an advantage, but not a requisite to succeed in this course. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Islam as a religious system as well as a historical phenomenon throughout the course.
View course details
Description
NES 3519 : History of State and Society in Modern Iran (Through Literature and Film)
Crosslisted as: HIST 3519 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the conditions of strict censorship and numerous limitations on various forms of political organization and activism, literature and cinema, especially Iran's internationally acclaimed art cinematography, have been the major outlets through which the social and political concerns of the Iranian society have been voiced throughout the modern period. The course explores major themes and periods in Iran's transition from the secular state of the Pahlavi dynasty to the religious state of the Islamic Republic in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will focus on social as well as political themes including the Anglo-Russo-American Occupation of Iran, the 1979 Islamic Revolution, U.S.-Iranian relations, Iraq-Iran War, the Green Movement and the crisis of Islamic government, Images of the West in Iran, Modern Youth Culture, Gender segregation, and the struggle between modernity and traditionalism in contemporary Iran. We will watch selected Iranian documentary and feature films and draw on modern Persian literature but will approach them not as art forms but as reflections of major socio-economic, political, and religious phenomena in Iran's modern history. We will read and watch what the Iranians wrote and produced, read and watched, in order to view and explain Iran and its relations with the West through the Iranian eyes. We will examine how the Iranians perceived themselves and the others, how they viewed their own governments and the West, what issues inspired and shaped their outlook outside the official censorship during the period in question. All readings are in English translation and the films are with English subtitles. The course includes lectures deconstructing political, religious, and social evolution of modern Iran as well as regular class discussions where we will address the issues in question from a variety of perspectives.
View course details
Description
NES 3525 : Palestinians in Israel
Crosslisted as: JWST 3525, NES 6525 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 3550 : Origins of Monotheism
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3550, JWST 3550, RELST 3550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 3629 : Greek New Testament Readings
Crosslisted as: CLASS 3629, JWST 3629, RELST 3629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A weekly seminar that may be taken in addition to NES 2629. The seminar will provide an opportunity to read portions of the New Testament and other early Christian writings in Greek. We will work on grammatical and textual issues as well as other problems related to translations.
View course details
Description
ARAB 3654 : Arab Minority Voices
Crosslisted as: ARAB 6654 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, we will read authentic Arabic texts by and about minorities in the Arab world. We will begin with short fiction and poetry that reflects on relations between Muslims, Christians, and Jews beginning in the 20th century. We will also discuss articles and essays about contemporary minority-majority relations. Possible topics include: exploring the roots of the referendum on independence of Iraqi Kurdistan in Fall 2017; and discussing the extent to which the war in Yemen should be considered a sectarian Sunni-Shica conflict. This course is designed to aid students in improving their reading skills in Arabic.
View course details
Description
NES 3655 : Minorities of the Middle East
Crosslisted as: COML 3743, JWST 3655, NES 6655 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the historic diversity of the modern Middle East, exploring histories of inter-communal contact and conflict. We begin by investigating the legacy of the Ottoman Empire and the impact of its dissolution. We will focus our attention on commercial centers that fostered inter-communal relations, as well as investigating sites of strife and cases of minority repression. We will read histories, memoirs, and fiction, and view films that help us better understand inter-communal relations, tensions, and conflict. We will also interrogate the terms for exploring a range distinctions among majority and minority populations including: religious difference (Muslims, Christians, and Jews); divisions of religious rite (Sunni and Shi'a); entho-linguistic minorities (Armenians and Kurds); national identities (Israelis and Palestinians); cultures of origin (Mizrahi, Sephardi, and Ashkenazi Jews). We will explore how these divisions inform urgent current conflicts: the civil war in Syria and the refugee crisis; the civil war in Iraq and the campaign by ISIS against minorities; as well as tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran.
View course details
Description
ARAB 3700 : Arabic Language Through Film
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The objective of this course is to help students develop all four communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through the use of Arabic films coupled with other structured materials such as study guides, short readings and other authentic resources. Each lesson focuses on student-centered and interactive activities that include pair or group work, role-play, debates, and class presentations.
View course details
Description
NES 3920 : The Trans-Sahara Anti-Terrorist Campaign: Chasing AQMI, Al-Qaeda, and ISIS in an African Desert
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3420, GOVT 3423 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Since the events of September 11, 2001, the war on terrorism has been the focus of US foreign policy in Africa. This focus has led to major adjustments in US priorities in Africa, including the pairing of diplomacy, defense, and development into new forms of cooperation and intervention. One of the framework for the new approach is the Trans Sahara Counter Terrorism Partnership (TSCTP) under which the US has associated ten African countries in its global fight against terrorism. The TSCTP is predicated on the idea that significant areas of Africa, peopled as they are by weak states, could become a safe haven for terrorist groups linked with al-Qaeda, the Salafists, and other radical Islamic groups including ISIL today. This course explores the operations of the TSCTP and points of friction between the US and the populations of the zone of implementation. We will place special emphasis on African suspicions of some key tenets of the war on terrorism and skepticism of the methods adopted in the war on terrorism. Key among these are the principle of securing the primary of counterterrorism and the necessary institutional frictions that arise when considering development and good governance.
View course details
Description
NES 4520 : Jewish Cities
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4620, ANTHR 7620, HIST 4520, HIST 6520, JWST 4520, JWST 7520, NES 7520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
From Jerusalem to Rome, from Shanghai to Marrakesh, Jews and cities have been shaping each other for thousands of years. This course ranges through time and space to examine how Jewish and other "minority" experiences offer a window onto questions of modernity and post-colonialism in intersections of the built environment with migration, urban space, and memory. Readings and film/video encompass historical, ethnographic, visual, architectural and literary materials to offer a broad look at materials on ghettos, empires, cosmopolitanism, tolerance, immigrant enclaves, race and ethnicity.
View course details
Description
NES 4530 : The Caucasus: Captives, Cultures, Crossroads
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4030, ANTHR 7030, ARKEO 4030, ARKEO 7030, NES 6530 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Caucasus occupies a distinctive place within both the ancient and modern imagination. It is a region long anchored to tropes of disobedience, punishment, and redemption. It is also a place in which liminality, betwixt and between Europe and Asia, endures as both a perceived geographic imaginary and an experienced condition in the detritus of imperialisms past. The Caucasus's extraordinary diversity in languages and ethnicities has generated a deep suspicion of it by those surrounding the region, and has sparked profound social tragedies. But it has also stimulated a curiosity that has generated meditations on culture, identity, and social life. This course explores the Caucasus through its archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, music, and film. We will examine the entanglement of the region's history with its internal and external representations in order to get a sense of the array of forces shaping the Caucasus today.
View course details
Description
NES 4537 : Shi'ism: Debates and Discourses
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4637, ANTHR 7637, NES 6537, RELST 4537, RELST 6537 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 4560 : Theory and Method in Near Eastern Studies
Crosslisted as: NES 6560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Requirement for NES majors.  Seminar offering advanced Near Eastern Studies students the opportunity to read and discuss the range of theories and methods that have been employed by scholars in the interdisciplinary area of Near Eastern Studies. After giving attention to the historical development of area studies programs--and their current status and relevance--students read a wide range of influential works in Near Eastern Studies, with special attention to the concept of "orientalism".   Literary theory, anthropology, historiography, post-colonialism, archaeology, gender theory, and comparative religions are a few of the approaches, methods, and theories we will explore. Authors include Talal Asad, Richard Bulliet, Clifford Geertz, Jon Levenson, Timothy Mitchell, Zachary Lockman, Edward Said, and J. Z. Smith.
View course details
Description
NES 4605 : Contesting Identities in Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4650, HIST 4091, NES 6605 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar examines the dynamics of modern collective identities which dominated the Egyptian public sphere in the long twentieth century. We will explore the underpinnings and formation of territorial Egyptian nationalism, pan-Arabism and Islamism through close readings and class discussions of important theoretical, historiographical and primary texts.
View course details
Description
NES 4626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4626, CLASS 7626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 4626, MEDVL 6626, NES 6626, RELST 4626, RELST 6626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 4644 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 4744, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 4652 : Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000)
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4651, FGSS 4652, NES 6652 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000) will explore the history of medicine and science in the Middle East from early modern period to the present. It covers the main topics and questions regarding bodies, diseases, and medical institutions within the framework of major historical developments in world and region's history. The course investigates how medicine and knowledge about diseases and bodies changed political and social conditions as well as how the latter defined and transformed the ways in which people imagined health, life, and environment. Scholars have often analyzed history of medicine in the Middle Eastern societies either in relation to Islamic culture in the early modern period or in relation to more recent Westernization. This course seeks to challenge these fixed paradigms and shed light onto questions and research agendas that will unearth the encounters, connections and mobility of bacteria, bodies, and medical methods among various communities by locating the history of medical knowledge and practices of the Middle East within global history.  It will highlight that the history of medicine in the colonial world itself is varied and wide ranging, investigating how medical missions intersected with civilizing missions, how colonial discourses were used to explain disease prevalence, and the relationship between the metropole and colony in propagating certain medical theories and practices. The course seeks to facilitate student engagement with various primary and secondary sources and new technologies to teach both historiographical methods and the content of the history of medicine in the Middle East.
View course details
Description
NES 4660 : Global Religious Revival of the 1970's
Crosslisted as: NES 6650, RELST 4660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the 1960s, religiosity was said to be a mere byproduct of tradition, increasingly marginalized by modernization. Yet, in an unexpected turn, the 1970s saw religious revival swept across the globe as societies from the Middle East to Latin America to the United States turned to their divine texts. In the four decades since, religious movements across the world have gained increasingly prominent positions in society and government. How do these mass movements happen? What exactly is the relation between specific revivals, their holy texts and the societies in which they arise? How do they affect politics? Are contemporary religious revivals broadly similar or do they contain geographical or religious particularities? In this seminar, we will begin to examine these questions through the prism of social movement theory, covering the Islamic Revival in Egypt, Religious Zionism in Israel, the rise of Liberation Theology in Latin America and the "Moral Majority" in the United States.  Drawing on texts, audio recordings, and video, we will explore how and why men and women turned to religion since the 1970s and how the practices of individual believers have shaped the relationship between religion and politics globally. Courses in varied religious traditions would be helpful, but are not a requirement, to succeed in this seminar.
View course details
Description
ARAB 4867 : In Search of the Original Quran
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Certain verses in the Quran have challenged Muslim interpreters as well as modern scholars. In some cases, the verses do not seem to fit the context; in others, they violate standard rules of Arabic grammar. Some in the Muslim tradition take these verses as evidence of the miraculous nature of the language of the Quran whose secrets only Allah knows. A number of modern scholars, particularly in the West, have tried to understand them by reference to Semitic languages, particularly Syriac and Hebrew, or by reference to Christian and Jewish traditions, which had a substantial influence on the language of the Quran. Some scholars have gone so far as to offer alternative readings of the Quranic text or to propose emendations.  Applying the tools of modern linguistic analysis, we will examine a sample of these passages, read their standard Muslim interpretation (tafsiir), identify grammatical and textual problems and propose alternative interpretations that arguably produce a semantically more coherent and grammatically sounder text.
View course details
Description
NES 4913 : Walter Benjamin
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4413, ANTHR 7413, COML 4429, GERST 4413, GERST 6413, JWST 4913, JWST 7913, NES 7913 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This extraordinary figure died in 1941, and his death  is emblematic of the intellectual depradations of Nazism. Yet since World War II, his influence, his reputation, and his fascination for scholars in a wide range of cultural and political disciplines has steadily grown. He is seen as a bridging figure between German and Jewish studies, between materialist critique of culture and the submerged yet powerful voice of theology, between literary history and philosophy. We will review Benjamin's life and some of the key disputes over his heritage; read some of the best-known of his essays; and devote significant time to his enigmatic and enormously rich masterwork, the Arcades Project, concluding with consideration of the relevance of Benjamin's insights for cultural and political dilemmas today.
View course details
Description
NES 4991 : Independent Study, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
For undergraduates who wish to obtain research experience or do extensive reading on a special topic. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course. For undergraduates who wish to obtain research experience or do extensive reading on a special topic. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course.
View course details
Description
NES 4992 : Independent Study, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
For undergraduates who wish to obtain research experience or do extensive reading on a special topic. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course.
View course details
Description
NES 4998 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Each fall, a small number of highly qualified seniors enter the Near Eastern Studies Honors Program. The Honors Program is open to NES majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis. Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. Students must also take two honors courses NES 4998 in fall and NES 4999 in spring, in addition to the regular major requirements. While admission to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Near Eastern Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
View course details
Description
NES 4998 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Each fall, a small number of highly qualified seniors enter the Near Eastern Studies Honors Program. The Honors Program is open to NES majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis. Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. Students must also take two honors courses NES 4998 in fall and NES 4999 in spring, in addition to the regular major requirements. While admission to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Near Eastern Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
View course details
Description
NES 4999 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Each fall, a small number of highly qualified seniors enter the Near Eastern Studies Honors Program. The Honors Program is open to NES majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis.  Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. Students must also take two honors courses NES 4998 in fall and NES 4999 in spring, in addition to the regular major requirements. While admission to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Near Eastern Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
View course details
Description
NES 4999 : Senior Honors Essay
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Each fall, a small number of highly qualified seniors enter the Near Eastern Studies Honors Program. The Honors Program is open to NES majors who have done superior work and who wish to devote a substantial part of their senior year to advanced, specialized, independent research and writing of a thesis.  Successfully completing an honors thesis will require sustained interest, exceptional ability, diligence, and enthusiasm. Students must also take two honors courses NES 4998 in fall and NES 4999 in spring, in addition to the regular major requirements. While admission to the Honors Program and completion of a thesis do not guarantee that students will be awarded honors in Near Eastern Studies, most students find the experience as intellectually rewarding as it is rigorous.
View course details
Description
NES 6525 : Palestinians in Israel
Crosslisted as: JWST 3525, NES 3525 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the political, intellectual, and cultural expression of Palestinian citizens of Israel. Referred to by the Arab media as "1948 Arabs" or "Arabs within" and by the Israeli media as "Israeli Arabs" or "the Arab sector," this community is marginalized and often overlooked. Our discussions will be situated within the context of the history of the Arab-Israeli and Israeli-Palestinian conflicts: the events of 1948-9 (Israeli Independence, the Nakba, the first Arab-Israeli War); the transformations wrought by the 1967 Arab-Israeli war; and the impact on Palestinian-Israelis of the first and second Intifada. We will also look at the status of Palestinian citizens within Israeli civil society: from the era of military rule (1948-1966) to the present. Our primary focus will be exploring words and images produced by Palestinian-Israeli writers, intellectuals, filmmakers, and artists to understand how members of this marginalized community assert their identities as both Palestinian and Israeli. All course materials are in English.
View course details
Description
NES 6530 : The Caucasus: Captives, Cultures, Crossroads
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4030, ANTHR 7030, ARKEO 4030, ARKEO 7030, NES 4530 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Caucasus occupies a distinctive place within both the ancient and modern imagination. It is a region long anchored to tropes of disobedience, punishment, and redemption. It is also a place in which liminality, betwixt and between Europe and Asia, endures as both a perceived geographic imaginary and an experienced condition in the detritus of imperialisms past. The Caucasus's extraordinary diversity in languages and ethnicities has generated a deep suspicion of it by those surrounding the region, and has sparked profound social tragedies. But it has also stimulated a curiosity that has generated meditations on culture, identity, and social life. This course explores the Caucasus through its archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, music, and film. We will examine the entanglement of the region's history with its internal and external representations in order to get a sense of the array of forces shaping the Caucasus today.
View course details
Description
NES 6537 : Shi'ism: Debates and Discourses
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4637, ANTHR 7637, NES 4537, RELST 4537, RELST 6537 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 6548 : City-Scapes of the Late Ottoman Empire
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6548, HIST 6548 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar is intended for Graduate students who are interested in exploring notions of space and place within the context of the late Ottoman Empire. Going beyond the examination of the "Islamic city" this seminar will bring theoretical readings about place making, in Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East, to bear on the late Ottoman case. From the urban frontiers of the empire to the capital, Istanbul, this seminar will tackle the latest in historical research on the late Ottoman Empire's parks, public monuments, city planning, public/private space, Ottoman official buildings, the "Turkish house," the "Arab house," city soundscapes, amongst others. We will critically examine how recent studies are re-shaping historians' knowledge of urban spaces and mental map of this vast empire.
View course details
Description
NES 6560 : Theory and Method in Near Eastern Studies
Crosslisted as: NES 4560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Requirement for NES majors.  Seminar offering advanced Near Eastern Studies students the opportunity to read and discuss the range of theories and methods that have been employed by scholars in the interdisciplinary area of Near Eastern Studies. After giving attention to the historical development of area studies programs--and their current status and relevance--students read a wide range of influential works in Near Eastern Studies, with special attention to the concept of "orientalism".   Literary theory, anthropology, historiography, post-colonialism, archaeology, gender theory, and comparative religions are a few of the approaches, methods, and theories we will explore. Authors include Talal Asad, Richard Bulliet, Clifford Geertz, Jon Levenson, Timothy Mitchell, Zachary Lockman, Edward Said, and J. Z. Smith.
View course details
Description
NES 6575 : Myth and Religion in Mesopotamia
Crosslisted as: JWST 2575, NES 2575, RELST 2575 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will survey the cultic practices and beliefs of ancient Babylonia and Assyria, the two major civilizations of Mesopotamia. We will examine the major myths of this region, e.g., Ishtar's Descent into the Netherworld, Etana, and Gilgamesh, in light of what they reveal about Mesopotamian religion, politics, and understanding of the afterlife. We will also examine the performance of magical rituals and incantations, methods of predicting the future, and the role of sacred marriage, prostitution, and slavery in the ancient temple.
View course details
Description
NES 6605 : Contesting Identities in Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4650, HIST 4091, NES 4605 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar examines the dynamics of modern collective identities which dominated the Egyptian public sphere in the long twentieth century. We will explore the underpinnings and formation of territorial Egyptian nationalism, pan-Arabism and Islamism through close readings and class discussions of important theoretical, historiographical and primary texts.
View course details
Description
NES 6626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4626, CLASS 7626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 4626, MEDVL 6626, NES 4626, RELST 4626, RELST 6626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 6644 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 4744, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 6650 : Global Religious Revival of the 1970's
Crosslisted as: NES 4660, RELST 4660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the 1960s, religiosity was said to be a mere byproduct of tradition, increasingly marginalized by modernization. Yet, in an unexpected turn, the 1970s saw religious revival swept across the globe as societies from the Middle East to Latin America to the United States turned to their divine texts. In the four decades since, religious movements across the world have gained increasingly prominent positions in society and government. How do these mass movements happen? What exactly is the relation between specific revivals, their holy texts and the societies in which they arise? How do they affect politics? Are contemporary religious revivals broadly similar or do they contain geographical or religious particularities? In this seminar, we will begin to examine these questions through the prism of social movement theory, covering the Islamic Revival in Egypt, Religious Zionism in Israel, the rise of Liberation Theology in Latin America and the "Moral Majority" in the United States.  Drawing on texts, audio recordings, and video, we will explore how and why men and women turned to religion since the 1970s and how the practices of individual believers have shaped the relationship between religion and politics globally. Courses in varied religious traditions would be helpful, but are not a requirement, to succeed in this seminar.
View course details
Description
NES 6652 : Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000)
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4651, FGSS 4652, NES 4652 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000) will explore the history of medicine and science in the Middle East from early modern period to the present. It covers the main topics and questions regarding bodies, diseases, and medical institutions within the framework of major historical developments in world and region's history. The course investigates how medicine and knowledge about diseases and bodies changed political and social conditions as well as how the latter defined and transformed the ways in which people imagined health, life, and environment. Scholars have often analyzed history of medicine in the Middle Eastern societies either in relation to Islamic culture in the early modern period or in relation to more recent Westernization. This course seeks to challenge these fixed paradigms and shed light onto questions and research agendas that will unearth the encounters, connections and mobility of bacteria, bodies, and medical methods among various communities by locating the history of medical knowledge and practices of the Middle East within global history.  It will highlight that the history of medicine in the colonial world itself is varied and wide ranging, investigating how medical missions intersected with civilizing missions, how colonial discourses were used to explain disease prevalence, and the relationship between the metropole and colony in propagating certain medical theories and practices. The course seeks to facilitate student engagement with various primary and secondary sources and new technologies to teach both historiographical methods and the content of the history of medicine in the Middle East.
View course details
Description
ARAB 6654 : Arab Minority Voices
Crosslisted as: ARAB 3654 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, we will read authentic Arabic texts by and about minorities in the Arab world. We will begin with short fiction and poetry that reflects on relations between Muslims, Christians, and Jews beginning in the 20th century. We will also discuss articles and essays about contemporary minority-majority relations. Possible topics include: exploring the roots of the referendum on independence of Iraqi Kurdistan in Fall 2017; and discussing the extent to which the war in Yemen should be considered a sectarian Sunni-Shica conflict. This course is designed to aid students in improving their reading skills in Arabic.
View course details
Description
NES 6655 : Minorities of the Middle East
Crosslisted as: COML 3743, JWST 3655, NES 3655 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This examines the historic diversity of the modern Middle East, exploring histories of inter-communal contact and conflict. We begin by investigating the legacy of the Ottoman Empire and the impact of its dissolution. We will focus our attention on commercial centers that fostered inter-communal relations, as well as investigating sites of strife and cases of minority repression. We will read histories, memoirs, and fiction, and view films that help us better understand inter-communal relations, tensions, and conflict. We will also interrogate the terms for exploring a range distinctions among majority and minority populations including: religious difference (Muslims, Christians, and Jews); divisions of religious rite (Sunni and Shica); entho-linguistic minorities (Armenians and Kurds); national identities (Israelis and Palestinians); cultures of origin (Mizrahi, Sephardi, and Ashkenazi Jews). We will explore how these divisions inform urgent current conflicts: the civil war in Syria and the refugee crisis; the civil war in Iraq and the campaign by ISIS against minorities; as well as tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran.
View course details
Description
NES 6800 : Practicum in Near Eastern Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
NES 6960 : Rites of Contact
Crosslisted as: COML 6960, GERST 6960 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
New forms of German literature emerged in the wake of transnational labor migration, especially after 1989. Taking leave of a sociological model that interprets this literature as a plea for compassionate intercultural dialogue, this course juxtaposes prose fiction about cultural contact and critical theories of difference with two primary goals in mind. Students will be introduced to representative examples of contemporary German literatures of migration, and critical modes of conceptualizing cultural contact in Germany will be compared in relation to each other and in tension with the literary field. A focus on German literature of Turkish migration will be complemented by readings reflecting other transnational phenomena such as postsocialism, postcolonialism, and globalization.
View course details
Description
NES 6991 : Independent Study: Graduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
For graduate students who wish to do intensive reading on a focused topic. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member that has agreed to supervise the course.
View course details
Description
NES 6992 : Independent Study: Graduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
For graduate students who wish to do intensive reading on a focused topic. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member that has agreed to supervise the course.
View course details
Description
NES 7520 : Jewish Cities
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4620, ANTHR 7620, HIST 4520, HIST 6520, JWST 4520, JWST 7520, NES 4520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
From Jerusalem to Rome, from Shanghai to Marrakesh, Jews and cities have been shaping each other for thousands of years. This course ranges through time and space to examine how Jewish and other "minority" experiences offer a window onto questions of modernity and post-colonialism in intersections of the built environment with migration, urban space, and memory. Readings and film/video encompass historical, ethnographic, visual, architectural and literary materials to offer a broad look at materials on ghettos, empires, cosmopolitanism, tolerance, immigrant enclaves, race and ethnicity.  
View course details
Description
NES 7913 : Walter Benjamin
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4413, ANTHR 7413, COML 4429, GERST 4413, GERST 6413, JWST 4913, JWST 7913, NES 4913 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This extraordinary figure died in 1941, and his death is emblematic of the intellectual depradations of Nazism. Yet since World War II, his influence, his reputation, and his fascination for scholars in a wide range of cultural and political disciplines has steadily grown. He is seen as a bridging figure between German and Jewish studies, between materialist critique of culture and the submerged yet powerful voice of theology, between literary history and philosophy. We will review Benjamin's life and some of the key disputes over his heritage; read some of the best-known of his essays; and devote significant time to his enigmatic and enormously rich masterwork, the Arcades Project, concluding with consideration of the relevance of Benjamin's insights for cultural and political dilemmas today.
View course details
Description